a-dolf-in:

Gotta love club penguin😂

via / org 19 Apr    304659




yes-i-am-lucifer:

pmon3y69:

drdawg:

my friend Pete literally makes me cry with his snap stories

this is me, i am pete, love me 

we love you pete

via / org 17 Apr    296847




via / org 17 Apr    18917




hyyy-errr:

rxdicvl:

dichotomization:

On June 11th 1963, Thích Quảng Đức, a Vietnamese Buddhist monk, sat down in the middle of a busy intersection in Saigon, covered himself in gasoline and he then ignited a match, and set himself on fire. Đức burned to death in a matter of minutes, and he was immortalized in a famous photograph taken by a reporter who was in Vietnam in order to photograph the war. All those who saw this spectacle were taken by the fact that Duc did not make a sound while burning to death. Đức was protesting President Ngô Đình Diệm’s administration for oppressing the Buddhist religion.

holy shit. 

I was waiting for this to come up on my dash. You also can’t forget that his whole body burned, but his heart remained intact and did not burn.

via 16 Apr    409535




camerondatass:

mostlymagcon:

the-awesome-adventurer:

the-awesome-adventurer:

the-awesome-adventurer:

I think the snapchats of my math teacher are the only thing I’ll be remembered for and I’m okay with that

I got suspended, Thursday school, and moved to an entirely different classroom because of this post.

I JUST FOUND OUT THEY BANNED SNAPCHAT ON MY SCHOOLS SERVER BECAUSE OF THIS OMFG

You’re a legend.

THIS IS MY FAV POST OF ALL TIME

via / org 13 Apr    456360




ziggystardick:

Bestfri(end)
Boyfri(end)
Girlfri(end)
B(∞)ty

via / org 13 Apr    160605




“As a species, humans manifest a quality called neoteny, the retention of juvenile characteristics into adulthood. Neoteny has physical ramifications—scarce body hair and a flat face are two examples—but it also has neurological ones. Namely, we have an extraordinary capacity to continue learning throughout life. If neoteny helps to explain our ability to learn, researchers are now figuring out what drives us to take advantage of it. In 2008, a group of scientists set up a novel fMRI study. When a sub­ject’s curiosity was piqued by a question (“What is the only country in the world that has a bill of rights for cows?” for instance), certain regions of the brain lit up. Those areas, known collectively as the basal ganglia, correspond to the brain’s reward centers—the same ones that govern our desire for sex or chocolate or total domination in Call of Duty 4. When people say they have an itch to figure something out, they’re not speaking metaphorically. They’re looking to get high on information. Curiosity, then, is not some romantic quality. It is an adaptive response. Humans may not be the fastest or strongest creatures, but through the blind luck of evolution, we developed the desire and capacity to continually update our understanding of the world. And that has allowed us to master it—or get darn close. Call it the biological basis for being a nerd.”
via / org 11 Apr    563




sexhaver:

rasputin:

Portuguese designer Susana Soares has developed a device for detecting cancer and other serious diseases using trained bees. The bees are placed in a glass chamber into which the patient exhales; the bees fly into a smaller secondary chamber if they detect cancer. 

Scientists have found that honey bees - Apis mellifera - have an extraordinary sense of smell that is more acute than that of a sniffer dog and can detect airborne molecules in the parts-per-trillion range. 

Bees can be trained to detect specific chemical odours, including the biomarkers associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, lung, skin and pancreatic cancer.

breathe into the BEE ORB to reveal your fate

via / org 09 Apr    322172




thecompanionsdoctor:

My week is basically:

via / org 08 Apr    364315




plaid-monkey:

You garden is quite lovely. It would be a shame if something were to… happen to it…

via 08 Apr    357670